Wool pre-order service 2018/19

Every Autumn, Nappy Ever After puts in orders for organic woollen clothing.  This October we will be just ordering from Engel Natur.  Preorders are due by Monday 29 October.  Here is a link to Engel Naturs 2018-19 online catalogue.

We keep down the price by taking pre-orders and pre-payment. This way you get high-quality organic merino wool and silk clothing (for babies, children and adults) at about 50% of the cost you would pay normally in a shop. Looked after properly these clothes are an investment; they last for ages, and baby and children’s clothes can be passed on.

For those of you who have a fear of washing wool there’s one simple rule: wool must be washed and rinsed at a similar temperature or you shock it.   If you do this they remain as good as new. If you want to see and touch samples of the products/fabrics come along during our Tuesday opening hours 2-6pm

In the past, customers have ordered natural wool/silk vests for babies, sleepsuits with feet (for babies who kick off the blankets), colourful sleeveless and long sleeve vests, leggings and organic cotton pants for kids as well as adults.

If you are interested in ordering please send us an email and we’ll let you know the prices (No price list as we can never predict what you want to order and there are sometimes differences in prices according to size).  If you decide to order pre-payment is required.

info@nappyeverafter.co.uk or call 020-7014 3006

PLEASE NOTE: Discounted prices are only available on pre-ordered items, not our usual stock lines. Prepayment is required. All orders are taken at the customer’s risk however we can advise on sizing. There are no returns or refunds on pre-ordered goods.

Soft merino wool bonnets by Engel

Soft merino wool bonnets

Advertisements
Image

Let’s Design Out Neglect

The recycling of nappy waste has been on the horizon for the last 15 years or more.  It’s just out of reach but the promise is, we’ll get there, it’s just a matter of time so we don’t need to do anything about nappy waste.  After all we have a growing aging population who need disposable incontinence products so we need to sort out nappy waste recycling for that too, right?  And it can all be turned into cat litter of which there is infinite demand, right?

 

But we agreed a waste hierarchy, the 3 Rs; Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and then disposal. Recycle is the second-worst solution to waste and yet we are constantly told recycling disposable nappy waste is the solution.  You can recycle anything but do we want to?  I was never convinced of the idea of fleece clothes made from recycled PET bottles.  Now we know, fleece sheds in the washing machine and is bad for the ocean.  Neither was I convinced of book marks or mouse mats made from old tyres – if it smells toxic it is toxic.

 

And just like book marks made of tyres, disposable nappies filled with SAPs (superabsorbent polymers) are toxic.  They are toxic when incinerated but they also have bad side-effects.  This can be changing babies less frequently leading to nappy rash.  It can also be putting a child in super-absorbent nappy pants and thinking you are potty training your child.  You are not.  This habit has led to children of four years and over arriving for school unable to take themselves to the toilet.  Who wants that for their child?

 

But SAPs in incontinence products for adults have also had unforeseen, unpleasant side-effects.  While  I was at the Buddhafield festival this year I saw this artwork on display.  It’s drawing attention to the fact that disabled people are being left all day in super-absorbent nappies and this is an abuse of their human rights.   It seems it’s not just waste that we need to design out of existence, it is also neglect.image

Often these disabled people are not incontinent but they do need help to actually sit on a toilet or commode.  The artwork and the UN say the  UK government is guilty of violating the UN disability convention.  No one would want this for their loved one.  How can this be happening in this country in this century?  This is neglect of the highest order.  To treat the most vulnerable in our society like this makes us all less than human.  How has this come about?  How can it be stopped?

 

We need to wake up to the fact that certain inventions and also ways of thinking;  economic efficiency and a slavish subservience to routines and procedures are the cause.  They are what allows us to rationalise that this is an okay way to treat people who are unable to take themselves to the toilet.

 

Sometimes convenience, super efficiency, the seduction of the easy option can be the problem.  When I had a baby in nappies I used mainly washable nappies but I usually had disposables in the house.  One day I realised I was too frequently reaching for the disposable thinking it was easier:  I was in a hurry or whatever.  So, what I did was put the pack of disposables at the back of a very high cupboard.  Before I could get a disposable nappy I needed to get a chair to stand on and move lots of things out of the way, I made them reachable but at a cost of time and energy.  I found I used hardly any disposable nappies after that.

 

I don’t claim to have a simple solution to stop the inhumanity of leaving physically disabled people sitting in their own waste for as long as 12 hours.  However, I have a suggestion that could be a step in the right direction.  It is the SAPs (superabsorbent polymers) that make incontinent products and nappies so efficient and allow for this sort of neglect.  If we were to stop making super abosorbent nappies we would remove our ability to do this.  With a less efficient product we would have to ensure these vulnerable people got enough visits to the toilet.

 

Perhaps you haven’t yet had a loved-one in a similar position.  When it happens to your loved-one, believe me, you will understand.  Something needs to be done.  And soon.

 

Meanwhile, we all need to be on board to raise awareness of washable nappies and the optimal time to help toddlers gain toileting independence.

 

Want to reduce nappy waste at family-friendly festivals?

Let’s face it, we go to festivals to relax and chill.  Taking babies and/or toddlers to festivals is a job in itself, right?  You wouldn’t expect parents to wash nappies at a festival, would you?

But on the other hand, people who go to festivals are probably more passionate about using washable nappies than the rest of the population.  They probably use them at home but they need some support and encouragement to use them at a festival.

And nappy waste is a cost for festivals.  A cost they’d like to minimise, right?  For the last 2 years Nappy Ever After has been attending Buddhafield Festival to find out what can be done to reduce festival nappy waste.

Here are our tips based on what  we’ve seen and heard:

  • Create a culture of minimal nappy wearing time.  Babies and toddlers really don’t need to be in nappies 24/7.  We’re in the open air, treat it like a garden, we’re with like-minded people.   But do clean up when necessary, obviously!
  • Encourage parents to bring a potty and let their children show off their recently acquired skill in full view of other children.  Seeing other children using the toilet/potty is inspiring to children still wearing nappies.
  • If you have a stay & play area make cotton nappies available for use while the child is there (local nappy laundry services can supply)
  • Parents find it useful to hire cotton nappies and a bucket for washing: less to carry there and back!  Most of the nappies will only be damp and poo is caught on a bio-degradable liner that can go in the compost loo.  You do have composting loos at your festival, right?
  • Parents find they can wash nappies in cold water and hang out to dry.  Sunshine bleaches and sterilises.
  • Provide under cover washing lines for airing nappies over night so cloth nappy families don’t have to share their sleeping space with damp nappies.
  • Organise on site advice and activities around  washing nappies, potty training, EC and more.  Local nappy companies or nappy libraries are likely to be happy to attend.

For further information email or call Nappy Ever After. Contact details via our website.  If you have experience of washing nappies at festivals please post your views and experience below.

 

Real Nappy Week 2018 – post 6

If you’re looking for offers, sorry, our Special Bundles are such good value – you get over £70 worth of nappy kit for £54.15 – I’m afraid we can offer no better deal this week.  At Nappy Ever After, if you want to try out real nappies, every week is Real Nappy Week!

But we have a special message for you that we’ve pinched from Tracey Emin:

“I want my time with you”

Which ever nappy you use, when you have time, take the opportunity to connect with your baby/toddler at nappy change time.  There are those who tell us nappy changing should be quick and efficient, the quicker the better.  But changing a nappy is a time to connect with your baby and spend precious time together.  Of course, life means some changes have to be quick and efficient but you choose when, don’t let them tell you that’s the way nappy changing should be.  And baby brain guru, Suzanne Zeedyk illustrates why.  This gorgeous short film shows a baby less than 6 weeks old taking the opportunity to smile at mummy during a nappy change.

This post is the final one of a six part series of posts leading up to Real Nappy Week 2018 (23-29 April.) Nappy Ever After, a not-for-profit real nappy social enterprise is 15 years old this year. Working in partnership with local authorities and parents, we have tested out the market for washable nappies in depth, through offering a local nappy laundry service and selling real nappies face-to-face. What we know is that recovering the culture of reusable nappies is slow, but a significant level of disposable nappy waste is reduced when a culture of real nappies thrives in local areas.

 

Real Nappy Week 2018 – post 5

When disposable nappies first entered the market they were not popular.  It is SAPs (superabsorbent polyacrylate) that revolutionised single-use nappies.  SAPs are the superabsorbent gel micro plastic pellets that you can see on your baby’s skin when you leave a disposable on for too long.

Before SAPs, single-use nappies were inferior in performance to cloth nappies.  Basically the paper pulp of the nappy started disintegrating on baby’s bottom as soon as it started to get damp.

SAPs have incredible absorbency absorbing and holding a huge amount of liquid, relative to their size. SAPs can hold between 50 and 500 times their own weight, depending on the liquid they’re absorbing. In contrast, cotton and fluff pulp hold only 20 times their own weight.

So SAPs mean you can change your baby less frequently than you would change a baby wearing a cloth nappy.  However, SAPs are the problem when it comes to nappy waste.  They are basically urine saturated plastic, so when incinerated, because they are damp, they actually use energy in the burning process.  ‘Recycling’ them is a water and energy wasting business.  In landfill they absorb even more water.  SAPs are the part of the nappy that prevents the composting of disposable nappies.

If we were serious about the environmental impact of disposable nappies we would ban SAPs from nappies.  They could then be collected and composted quite easily.  But then, disposable nappies wouldn’t have their USP and cloth nappies and SAP nappies would have a level playing field.

The advantage of this level playing field would be that parents/carers would get used to changing baby every 3-4 hours and more people would find cloth nappies have adequate absorbency.  Another advantage would be that it’s likely that children would come out of nappies earlier because just leaving toddlers in nappies with infrequent changes tends to mean parents/carers tend to miss the ‘windows of opportunity’ of potty training and then making the transition to toileting independence bears the risk of becoming a trauma for parent and child.

There is a ‘window of opportunity’ NOW in the UK to reduce plastic waste.  This is the time to talk about banning SAPs from nappies.  If the UK government were to say they will be banned in 10 years time, this gives the disposable nappy industry time to adjust and gives a positive signal that cloth nappies are a good alternative.

At Nappy Ever After we want parents to know there is an alternative to single-use nappies.  There has been much debate about the environmental advantage of cloth nappies over single-use nappies, due to the use of water, detergent and energy used to wash nappies.  However what’s clear is that there is an undeniable environmental advantage to children coming out of nappies at the earliest opportunity.  Toddlers and parents also benefit from a child gaining toileting independence.

But another advantage is that washing nappies puts you in touch with a community of people who talk about doing the laundry in the most eco-friendly way, we also talk about children gaining toileting independence through play, we also engage with issues around fast fashion, reuse and repair, buying and appreciating high quality second-hand clothing and toys.  We also talk about composting and recycling.  It’s about helping parents become less dependent on single-use products and more resourceful.  As we parents are the ones raising the next generation, that seems like the most important reason for putting people in touch with their local reusable nappy supplier!

This is post five of a six part series leading up to Real Nappy Week 2018 (23-29 April.)  Nappy Ever After, a not-for-profit real nappy social enterprise is 15 years old this year. Working in partnership with local authorities and parents, we have tested out the market for washable nappies in depth, through offering a local nappy laundry service and selling real nappies face-to-face. What we know is that recovering the culture of reusable nappies is slow, but a significant level of disposable nappy waste is reduced when a culture of real nappies thrives in local areas.

 

Real Nappy Week 2018 – post 4

Nappy Ever After’s shop is open every Tuesday from 2-6pm, just show up, no booking necessary.  We also run a real nappy workshop one Saturday a month.  Check our website to book a place.  Our address is 81 Murray Grove, N1 7QJ.

Our shop is a 7 minutes walk from Old Street stations or 5 mins walk from bus stops on City Road and New North Road.  You can also reach us via Regent’s Canal.  Leave the tow path at Shepherdess Bridge.

We are the only place in London where you can see, touch and talk about washable nappies every week.  Many people these days are happy to buy on the internet but we are here for you if you want to see before you buy.  Babies are welcome!  You can try on a nappy to test out the size and fit.image

Nappy Ever After stocks all the major brands: BambinoMio, bumGenius, gDiapers, Bummis, Disana, Motherease and more.  We want to make real nappies simple.  Our trial packs allow you to start out at a low cost and build up your nappy stash based on your experience.  Choosing real nappies is much less stressful and risky than buying a pushchair as your investment can be spread out over time, based on what works best for you and your baby.

Don’t wait for Real Nappy Week to buy our £54.15 trial pack.  It is worth £70 and this offer is available all year round!  Real Nappies for London vouchers accepted.

We also offer a nappy laundry service, a weekly delivery of soft, sterile, cotton nappies.  We take away the used nappies to be washed and used again.  To be truly sustainable we do all our deliveries with an electric freight bike which limits our geographical reach.  If you are interested please check our website to see if we cover your area.

 

This post is part four of a six part series of posts leading up to Real Nappy Week 2018 (23-29 April.) Nappy Ever After, a not-for-profit real nappy social enterprise is 15 years old this year. Working in partnership with local authorities and parents, we have tested out the market for washable nappies in depth, through offering a local nappy laundry service and selling real nappies face-to-face. What we know is that recovering the culture of reusable nappies is slow, but a significant level of disposable nappy waste is reduced when a culture of real nappies thrives in local areas.

Real Nappy Week 2018 – post 3

If you think about it, it’s not surprising that most people use disposable nappies.  From the moment your baby is born, indeed even before your baby is born disposable nappies are established as the norm by our most trusted sources of advice and information: midwives.  Either expectant parents are given a hospital bag list that has ‘disposable nappies’ on it or disposable nappies are supplied on the ward.   Parents do not take the nappy waste home with them.  The hospital or birth centre procures, at a cost, clinical waste disposal services.

There is procurement legislation in the UK that says that ‘all establishments’  (and this includes hospitals and birth centres) should procure according to the waste hierarchy: preventing waste is at the top.  Currently most hospitals are not following this legislation and procuring disposal of nappy waste services instead of switching their establishment to reusable nappies.

Cloth nappies could  be used on London maternity wards and washed at the hospital laundry or sent out to a local laundry that deals with incontinence wear.  Hospital staff nurseries could be saving money, reducing waste and changing the idea that disposable nappies are normal by using cloth nappies.

If you would like to find out more about using cloth nappies on your maternity ward or in the hospital staff nursery please get in touch.  Indeed, Nappy Ever After has a huge stash of prem cotton nappies that used to be used on hospital wards and could be put back to use.

 

This is post three of a six part series leading up to Real Nappy Week 2018 (23-29 April.)  Nappy Ever After, a not-for-profit real nappy social enterprise is 15 years old this year. Working in partnership with local authorities and parents, we have tested out the market for washable nappies in depth, through offering a local nappy laundry service and selling real nappies face-to-face. What we know is that recovering the culture of reusable nappies is slow, but a significant level of disposable nappy waste is reduced when a culture of real nappies thrives in local areas.